Postdoctoral Fellow – Using Single-Cell Genomics to Decode Brain Function


We are seeking candidates interested in using single-cell RNA sequencing to decode brain regions involved in regulating hunger, other homeostatic motivational drives, and physiology. The goals are to: a) create neural “parts lists” for these regions, b) develop hypotheses about how these neural “parts” work within circuits to control behavior and physiology, and c) use cell-specific neuroscience technologies to interrogate hypotheses.
Ideal candidates will have experience with RNA-seq, facility with statistics and analyses of big data sets, and be interested in neural circuits controlling homeostatic motivational drives and physiology. Basic programming experience, though not strictly required, is preferred. Candidates must have PhD, MD, or MD/PhD degrees. Enabling the above-mentioned goals, our group has state-of-the-art expertise in single neuron and single nuclei transcriptomics (Drop-seq, sNuc-seq, etc.), bioinformatic analysis of single-cell datasets to determine a “parts list” for each brain site (see Campbell JN, et al., Nat Neurosci, 2017), rapid CRISPR/Cas9-mediated generation of recombinase driver mice to provide cell-specific experimental access to newly discovered “parts” (i.e. neurons), and finally cell-specific neuroscience techniques including approaches used for: 1) mapping neural circuitry in mice, 2) manipulating neural activity, in vivo, using optical and/or chemogenetic approaches, 3) monitoring of neural activity in vivo with Ca2+-based imaging and/or optetrode technologies, 4) brain slice
electrophysiology, and 5) advanced viral technologies.

 

Staff Scientist – Using Single-Cell Genomics to Decode Brain Function


We are seeking Staff Scientists interested in using single-cell RNA sequencing to decode brain regions involved in regulating hunger, other homeostatic motivational drives, and physiology. The goal is to use single cell genomics to create neural “parts lists” for interesting brain regions, develop hypotheses about how these neural “parts” work within circuits to control behavior and physiology, and finally in collaboration with a team of neuroscientists, interrogate these hypotheses using neuron-specific neuroscience technologies.
Ideal candidates will have experience with RNA-seq, facility with statistics and analyses of big data sets, and be interested in neural circuits controlling homeostatic motivational drives and physiology. Basic programming experience, though not strictly required, is preferred. Candidates must have MS or PhD degrees.
Enabling the above-mentioned goals, our group has state-of-the-art expertise in single neuron and single nuclei transcriptomics (Drop-seq, sNuc-seq, etc.), bioinformatic analysis of single-cell datasets to determine a “parts list” for each brain site (see Campbell JN, et al., Nat Neurosci, 2017), rapid CRISPR/Cas9-mediated generation of recombinase driver mice to provide cell-specific experimental access to newly discovered “parts” (i.e. neurons), and finally cell-specific neuroscience techniques including approaches used for: 1) mapping neural circuitry in mice, 2) manipulating neural activity, in vivo, using optical and/or chemogenetic approaches, 3) monitoring of neural activity in vivo with Ca2+-based imaging and/or optetrode technologies, 4) brain slice electrophysiology, and 5) advanced viral technologies.